Building    From 1350  To 1531

Kennington Palace

Categories: Architecture

Royal Palace. Records of the time indicate that Edward the Black Prince was building at Kennington from the early 1340s until about 1350. Between 1353 and 1363 further work took place and some of the earlier buildings were demolished. There is evidence from contemporary writings that it was used by the king as an occasional place of refuge from London politics. In 1531 the greater part of the building was demolished by Henry VIII to provide materials for his own palace at Whitehall.

The historical manor of Kennington continues to be owned by the current monarch's elder son (the Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall). The Duchy of Cornwall maintains a substantial property portfolio within the area (e.g. Newquay House).

Credit for this entry to: Alan Patient of www.plaquesoflondon.co.uk

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Kennington Palace

Commemorated ati

Kennington Palace

Kennington Palace stood here from c. 1350 - 1531 built by the first Duke of C...

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