Place    From 1820 

Limehouse Basin

Categories: Property

The basin was built, as "Regent’s Canal Dock", by the Regent's Canal Company so that goods could be taken from sea-going vessels in the Thames and transferred to canal boats for distribution along the Regent's Canal. Initially a failure, it became the most important point of entry for access to the entire canal system, especially for coal.

A London Inheritance explains how this basin was used as the western end of the Limehouse Cut 1853-64.

By the mid 20th century the entire canal system was put out of business by the railways and the basin was closed to commercial traffic in 1969. At the same time the basin again became the route from the Thames through to the Limehouse Cut.

 Redevelopment of the basin started in 1983 and was still on-going in 2008.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Limehouse Basin

Commemorated ati

Limehouse basin model

{At the centre of this circular plaque/low relief sculpture:} This plaque was...

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Other Subjects

Cobley Farm / Fallow Farm

Cobley Farm / Fallow Farm

First documented in 1674, at its largest the farmland was bounded by High Road, Ballards Lane, Long Lane, Squire's Lane.  The Cobley family owned it from 1680 to 1902 when it was sold, the building...

Place, Gardens / Agriculture, Property

1 memorial
Jeffrey Morgan

Jeffrey Morgan

Building houses in Islington in 1824.

Person, Property

1 memorial
B. E. Nightingale

B. E. Nightingale

Benjamin Ebenezer Nightingale was born in 1837 in Lambeth, Surrey. He was a son of Benjamin Ebenezer Nightingale (1803-1868) and Margaret Nightingale née Dickinson (1811-1887). On 7 January 1838 he...

Person, Property

2 memorials
Buckingham House, College Hill

Buckingham House, College Hill

Built, possibly, in 1672 and still there in 1720 for John Strype to write: “.. on the East side of Colledge Hill is St. Michaels Royal Church, and almost over against the said Church, is Buckingham...

Building, Property

1 memorial