Building    From 1150  To 1650

Winchester Palace

Categories: Property, Religion

A nearby information board gives:

These ruins are all that remain of the palace of the powerful Bishops of Winchester, one of the largest and most important buildings in medieval London. Founded in the 12th century by Bishop Henry de Blois, brother of King Stephen, it was built to house the bishops in comfort when staying in London on royal or administrative business.
The visible remains were part of the Great Hall, which formerly stood alongside the south bank of the Thames. To the right {west}, the gable wall of the hall has doors which led to the buttery, pantry and kitchen, and it has a magnificent rose window.

Below the hall was a vaulted cellar, where goods such as wine could be stored, with a passage to the river wharf. The hall would have been lavishly decorated, and was often used to entertain royal guests, such as James I of Scotland and Joan Beaufort, who held their wedding feast here in 1424.

The rest of the palace was arranged around two courtyards, and housed many buildings, including a prison, brewhouse and butchery. As the Bishop’s private retreat from the stresses of medieval governance, the palace also had a tennis court, bowling alley and pleasure gardens. The palace remained in use until the 17th century, when it was divided into tenements and warehouses. The ruins were rediscovered in the 19th century following a fire, and were finally revealed in the 1980s during redevelopment of the area.

Our dates for this building are very approximate.

A London Inheritance has a great post about this.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Winchester Palace

Commemorated ati

Winchester Palace

The Rose Window in the west gable of the Great Hall of the London Palace of t...

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Other Subjects

H. Johnson & Co

H. Johnson & Co

Terracotta manufacturers based in Ditchling, Sussex.  Made the Stratford Martyrs memorial.  From Tile Gazetteer - Newham: "Johnson’s, who were active from the 1870s, made terracotta, bricks, tile...

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1 memorial
Marylebone Association for Improving the Dwellings of the Industrious Classes

Marylebone Association for Improving the Dwellings of the Industrious Classes

Incorporated by royal charter in 1854, possibly on 7th April. Still operating in 1928.

Group, Philanthropy, Property, Social Welfare

1 memorial
Columbia Market

Columbia Market

In 1852, the area Novia Scotia Gardens being a notorious slum, Angela Burdett-Coutts bought it with the intention of developing healthy accommodation for the poor and a market for their use. Howeve...

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Rookfield Garden Village

Rookfield Garden Village

Suburban housing estate in Muswell Hill, originated by William Jefferies Collins and developed by his sons William Brannan Collins and Herbert Collins. 'Rookfield Garden Estate - a study of the in...

Place, Property

1 memorial
George Bird and family

George Bird and family

Builders and brick makers in West London. Considering their contribution to many prominent projects (listed on the plaque), it is surprising that there is no information available on them. We firs...

Group, Property

1 memorial