Person    | Male  Born 1638  Died 1698

Nicholas Barbon

Nicholas Barbon

Builder and economist, a key figure in the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire. Laid out Essex Street in 1675. Also redeveloped Red Lion Fields and the Temple. It seems he was an extrovert rogue, dishonest and manipulative. Died, probably at his home in Osterley House, Middlesex, heavily in debt. Good write up at London Historians.

His father, a preacher and politician, had the unusual first name: "Praisegod". That we believe is true since the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography has an entry for Praisegod. Wikipedia's entry for Nicholas has his middle name as "Unless-Jesus-Christ-Had-Died-For-Thee-Thou-Hadst-Been-Damned". This is not mentioned in the ODNB so we wonder if it is one of those ho-ho-ho jokes for which Wikipedia's less-than-serious contributors are famed.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Nicholas Barbon

Commemorated ati

Essex Street & Essex Hall

This plaque was first erected at 7 Essex Street in 1962 and then re-erected h...

Read More

Other Subjects

Gravesend Pier

Gravesend Pier

Designed by William Tierney Clark. During its early years it was used by millions of passengers, but by the turn of the century, it had fallen into disuse owing to the arrival of the railways. A Gr...

Building, Architecture

1 memorial
Nathaniel Hanwell

Nathaniel Hanwell

Produced plans for St Thomas's Hospital gateway, 1682.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
William Butterfield

William Butterfield

Gothic Revival architect.  Born London.  Wikipedia give a list of his works and it is long, mainly churches, including in London: All Saints - Margaret Street; St Augustine's - Queen's Gate; St. Ma...

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
Essex Street, House & grounds

Essex Street, House & grounds

The site now covered by Essex Street and Devereux Court was once Essex House and grounds, named after Robert, Earl of Essex, Queen Elizabeth's favourite, who also led a rebellion against her which ...

Place, Architecture, Property

1 memorial
Northumberland House - St Martin's le Grand

Northumberland House - St Martin's le Grand

Belonged to King Henry IV who gave it to his wife Queen Jane after which it was called her Wardrobe. It was afterwards a printing-house, and then a tavern. Not to be confused with Northumberland Ho...

Building, Architecture

1 memorial