Person    | Male  Born 26/5/1700  Died 9/5/1760

Count Zinzendorf

Categories: Religion

Countries: Germany

Religious and social reformer, born Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendork und Pottendorf in Dresden, Germany. As a student at the Halle Academy, he and other young nobles founded a secret society called The Order of the Grain of Mustard Seed. Its purpose being that members would use their influence to spread the gospel. He reactivated the society in later years, attracting members such as the King of Denmark and the Archbishop of Canterbury. He gave asylum to a group of Moravians, and in 1727 left public life to spend the rest of his days working with them. A document known as the Brotherly Agreement was formulated, setting out the group's tenets. Through missionary work, their beliefs spread throughout the world. He died in Herrnhut, Germany.

Credit for this entry to: Alan Patient of www.plaquesoflondon.co.uk

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Count Zinzendorf

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