Building    From 1730 

Aubrey House

Categories: Architecture

Built in 1698 by a group of doctors and apothecaries as a spa. It was originally called 'The Villa', became Notting Hill House in 1795 and was renamed as Aubrey House in the 1850s. It is now a grade II listed building. The name is derived from Aubrey de Vere, who was the Norman feudal lord of the area. After Buckingham Palace, it has the second largest private garden in London.

At the Library Time Machine you can see some charmingly amateurish paintings of the inside of the house in 1817-18, and learn more about the history of the house. Owned and occupied briefly by the local developer Joshua Flesher Hanson.

Credit for this entry to: Alan Patient of www.plaquesoflondon.co.uk

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Aubrey House

Commemorated ati

Aubrey House

London County Council Aubrey House stands on the site of Kensington Wells an ...

Read More

Other Subjects

E. Vincent Harris

E. Vincent Harris

Architect with London County Council in 1905. Born Devonport, Plymouth.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
Surrey County Cinema

Surrey County Cinema

Originally called the Surrey County Theatre, it was renamed as a cinema in 1929, and in 1947, it became the 'Gaumont'. The auditorium has since been demolished, but the entrance and foyer were reta...

Building, Architecture, Cinema

1 memorial
Leverton arch

Leverton arch

Designed in 1800 by Leverton, one of the churchwardens at the time. Originally at the northern entrance on St Giles High Street. Moved in 1865 to its present location on Flitcroft Street.

Building, Architecture, Politics & Administration

1 memorial
St James's Gardens, W11

St James's Gardens, W11

RBKC and British History Online have a lot of information about the creation of this square, with plans and drawings.

Place, Architecture, Property

2 memorials