Building    From 1730 

Aubrey House

Categories: Architecture

Built in 1698 by a group of doctors and apothecaries as a spa. It was originally called 'The Villa', became Notting Hill House in 1795 and was renamed as Aubrey House in the 1850s. It is now a grade II listed building. The name is derived from Aubrey de Vere, who was the Norman feudal lord of the area. After Buckingham Palace, it has the second largest private garden in London.

At the Library Time Machine you can see some charmingly amateurish paintings of the inside of the house in 1817-18, and learn more about the history of the house. Owned and occupied briefly by the local developer Joshua Flesher Hanson.

Credit for this entry to: Alan Patient of www.plaquesoflondon.co.uk

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Aubrey House

Commemorated ati

Aubrey House

London County Council Aubrey House stands on the site of Kensington Wells an ...

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Other Subjects

H & H. M. Lidbetter

H & H. M. Lidbetter

Architects. H. Martin Lidbetter was the son of Hubert Lidbetter (1885-1966), best known for the Euston Road Friends Meeting House (1927). Hubert designed many Quaker meeting houses. Father and son ...

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
G. L. Wade

G. L. Wade

Architect active in 1883.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
Edwin Clare

Edwin Clare

Architect active in 1871. Probably the same Edwin Clare who worked on St. Silas' Penton Street and St Andrew's Croydon, both while based at 104 Guildford Street, and St Saviour's Forest Gate.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
C. T. Fulcher, OBE

C. T. Fulcher, OBE

Architect and Borough Surveyor for Shoreditch in 1949.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial
John Evans

John Evans

Built the first planned Admiralty Office in 1695. Became Navy Board Purveyor.

Person, Architecture

1 memorial