Place    From 11/7/1848 

Waterloo Station

Categories: Transport

Opened by the London and South Western Railway on 11 July 1848 as ‘Waterloo Bridge station’. Built to extend the line from Nine Elms closer to the City, with the expectation that the line would eventually be extended into the City itself. October 1882 it was renamed Waterloo station, reflecting common usage.

We cannot discover the architect of that first building, nor find a satisfactory image of it. Gaugemaster have a drawing but we find this 1888 plan more informative, also from Gaugemaster, who provide a good intro. to the station, including a photo of Abba (who else?) on a photoshoot.

For half a century the station expanded piecemeal, each development thought temporary, while the extension to the City was planned, negotiated and failed to materialise. Meanwhile the ever-more complex and confusing station became the butt of jokes. e.g. from Jerome K. Jerome's 'Three Men in a Boat': "We got to Waterloo at eleven, and asked where the eleven-five started from.  Of course nobody knew; nobody at Waterloo ever does know where a train is going to start from, or where a train when it does start is going to, or anything about it."

During this time the London Necropolis & National Mausoleum Company opened, in 1854, a private station inside Waterloo providing a link to Brookwood Cemetery; and Waterloo East was built, opening in 1869 as Waterloo Junction.

Eventually in 1898 L&SWR opened the underground Waterloo & City line, connecting Waterloo station to Bank-Monument station. Accepting that Waterloo would remain forever a terminus, they finally redesigned and rebuilt it, larger than before.

The new station was built and opened in stages starting in 1909 and, delayed by WW1, the whole station, including the war memorial Victory Arch, was finally declared open on 21 March 1922 by Queen Mary.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Waterloo Station

Commemorated ati

Waterloo Station - 175 years

{In the circle, with line drawings of an early steam engine and a current ele...

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Other Subjects

Harrow & Stanmore Railway

Harrow & Stanmore Railway

Our image shows the station building at Stanmore, renamed Stanmore Village. Dewi Williams has more photos of the building, in 1949. In 1882, nearby Bentley Priory, a stately home and deer park, wa...

Place, Transport

1 memorial
Underground Electric Railways of London

Underground Electric Railways of London

The fore-runner of the London Underground system. The London Electric Railways Company (1910-33) was a subsidiary of UERL and managed the deep-level companies: the Baker Street and Waterloo Railwa...

Place, Transport

1 memorial
Godspeed

Godspeed

One of the three ships which sailed in 1606 to found the Jamestown Settlement. Captained by Bartholomew Gosnold, she carried 49 colonists and 13 sailors. Our picture is of a replica.

Vehicle, Transport

1 memorial
Great Central Railway

Great Central Railway

A railway company which came into being when the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway changed its name in anticipation of the opening of its London extension. It was eventually grouped in...

Group, Transport

4 memorials
King William Street underground station

King William Street underground station

The station took over an existing building, number 46, entrance and booking hall on the ground floor with offices above. Became obsolete when the line was extended to Moorgate and was demolished in...

Building, Commerce, Transport

1 memorial