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Sandemanian chapel

Categories: Religion

The Sandemanians were a Christian sect founded by John Glas in Scotland and spread into England and America by his son-in-law Robert Sandeman. Sandeman arrived in London in April 1761 and established a congregation which met first at Glover’s Hall, then at St Martins-le-Grand, moving to Paul’s Alley in the Barbican in 1778 and to Barnsbury Grove (this building) in 1862 where they stayed until about 1900. Faraday first attended at Paul’s Alley as a child with his parents. In 1832 he was appointed Deacon and rose to the position of Elder (one of only three) which he held 1840-4 and 1860-4, the last two years being at the Barnsbury Grove Chapel where he continued to worship until his death. This Chapel was sometimes known as the Pocock’s Fields, or Bride Street, Chapel and its street has been renamed Faraday Close. In 1906 the building was converted to be the North Telephone Exchange (how appropriate is that?) and two memorials were erected and unveiled by Lord Kelvin: the floor-mounted brass “MF” shown here, which indicates the position of Faraday's pew,and a wall-mounted plaque which marked the position which he usually occupied on the preaching platform. This latter plaque has been removed.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Sandemanian chapel

Commemorated ati

Michael Faraday - N7 - M.F.

This extremely unusual memorial is a brass plate, only 4 or 5 inches across, ...

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Michael Faraday - N7 - plaque

This plaque was first erected in the Sandemanian Chapel, at the same time, 19...

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Other Subjects

Rev. the Hon. Edward Carr Glyn

Rev. the Hon. Edward Carr Glyn

Vicar of St Mary Abbots, Kensington in 1894. Bishop of Peterborough 1896 - 1916.

Person, Religion

1 memorial
John Knox Presbyterian Church

John Knox Presbyterian Church

The church was built on the site of what is now Clichy House.  The street at that time was Green Street but the address of the church seems to have been Oxford Street, the name the street took just...

Building, Religion

1 memorial
St Mary Woolnoth

St Mary Woolnoth

Has a strong historical connection with the abolitionist movement of the 18th and 19th centuries.  Rev John Newton, a slave-trader turned preacher and abolitionist, was rector 1780 – 1807.  Carolin...

Building, Race Issues, Religion

1 memorial
Bishop Henry Compton

Bishop Henry Compton

Bishop of London from 1675 to 1713. Born Warwickshire. After a period in Charles II's army he chose the church and within 5 years was made a bishop and a member of the Privy Council. His strong op...

Person, Gardens / Agriculture, Religion

1 memorial
St Mary Bothaw

St Mary Bothaw

'Bothaw' derived from 'boathouse', which makes sense when you remember that before the Embankment was built the Thames used be be a lot closer.  In existence by 1279, it was destroyed in the Great ...

Building, Religion

1 memorial