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All Hallows, Barking

Categories: Religion

The oldest church in the City, founded by the Saxon Abbey of Barking. Built on the site of a Roman building. Expanded and rebuilt several times. A nearby explosion in 1650 demolished the west tower. During the Great Fire of 1666 William Penn's father arranged for the surrounding buildings to be demolished to act as a fire break and so saved the church and Pepys used it as a vantage point from which to view the conflagration. In 1940 the church was badly damaged by bombs with only the tower and walls remaining. The reconstruction work completed in 1957. William Penn was baptised here. John Adams was married here. It is an interesting church to visit. Church's website.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
All Hallows, Barking

Commemorated ati

Tower Liberty

We normally rotate our memorial pictures as necessary to make sure the statue...

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Rev. Henry Allon

Rev. Henry Allon

Born near Hull.  Joint pastor of the Islington Union Chapel from 1843/4 with Thomas Lewis, taking sole charge on Lewis's death in 1852, until his own death.   Friends with Gladstone and Asquith (wh...

Person, Religion

1 memorial
Swedish Church

Swedish Church

There were enough Swedes in London (mainly sailors) for a congregation to form in 1710 and the first church was set up in Wapping in 1728 (pictured), opened by and named for (the future queen) Ulri...

Building, Religion, Sweden

2 memorials
William Hallywel

William Hallywel

Burnt at the stake in Bow (or possibly Stratford) for his Protestant beliefs.

Person, Execution, Religion

1 memorial
First Synagogue in Hackney

First Synagogue in Hackney

British History Online gives the following information: 'Benjamin Mendes da Costa and Jacob de Moses Franco were among the first members of the Jewish Board of Deputies in 1760, when every member o...

Building, Property, Religion

1 memorial
St Edmund King & Martyr, Lombard Street

St Edmund King & Martyr, Lombard Street

Destroyed in the Great Fire. The new building by Wren, 1670-1679, was damaged by bombing in 1917 but survives.

Building, Religion

1 memorial