Person    | Male  Born 21/12/1873  Died 18/2/1948

Lawrence Chubb

Lawrence Chubb

Sir Lawrence Wensley Chubb was an Anglo-Australian professional Secretary whose work was on environmentalist causes.

Born in Australia, he migrated to England and in 1891 was working as an auctioneer’s clerk and living with an uncle in Southwark. In 1895 Chubb became the first Secretary of the newly formed National Trust. Secretary of the Commons, Open Spaces and Footpaths Preservation Society, 1895-1948. Secretary of the National Playing Fields Association (now Fields in Trust), 1928-48.  Knighted in 1930.

Married in 1905. His son was also named Lawrence Wensley Chubb. Died Richmond.

From How Hampstead Heath Was Saved, a story of ‘people power’ by Helen Lawrence: “Another leading member of this circle was Lawrence Chubb, an Australian who came to London as a student in 1887. A keen walker, he was soon drawn into the open spaces movement by Octavia Hill after she heard him speak at a debate. He became the first Secretary of the National Trust from its foundation in 1895, then Secretary of the Commons Preservation Society, where he worked closely with Shaw Lefevre and Robert Hunter, founded the Ramblers’ Association, and played an instrumental role in saving Kenwood. All saw the provision of green open space and fresh air as part of the solution to the problems of the poor, and all had links to the campaign to extend Hampstead Heath.”

From Three Points of the Compass: In 1905 Chubb and J. A. Southern founded the London Federation of Rambling Clubs.

Campaigner Kate criticises Chubb for his role in the passing of the Access to Mountains Act 1939 which she considers to contain "pernicious provisions". "The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, with its imperfections and limited application, is undoubtedly far better". This controversy is covered at Open Spaces Society which closes with: "By the time of the annual report of 1946 Chubb had had the sense to admit that the act was unworkable; fortunately, it never came into operation. The war intervened and the act was repealed by the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949."

Media Storehouse have a photo of Chubb, which is rather silly and does not really help one know what he looked like. It's captioned: "Hartley Country Club ( Sir Lawrence Chubb ) 1935".  Old Tonbridge have a 1934 photo of Chubb but there are 5 men in the photo, only one of which is identified, and it's not Chubb.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Lawrence Chubb

Commemorated ati

Lawrence Chubb shelter - lost plaque

We are guessing that the plaque was fixed to the oblong section of wall that ...

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Other Subjects

Friends of Kelsey Park

Friends of Kelsey Park

Kelsey Park is in Beckenham, Kent. The objectives of the group are the conservation and protection of the park’s ecology, plants, animals, birds and its beauty. Its intention is to provide educatio...

Group, Community / Clubs, Gardens / Agriculture

1 memorial
Friends of Norwood Grove

Friends of Norwood Grove

Active in 1986 but it seems dormant now, 2022.

Group, Community / Clubs, Gardens / Agriculture

1 memorial
Manor of Hyde

Manor of Hyde

An area roughly equivalent to modern-day Hyde Park. It was owned by Westminster Abbey, and its woods afforded both fire-wood and shelter for the monks and for their game and water-fowl.

Place, Gardens / Agriculture

1 memorial