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Memorial

Cleopatra's needle Cleopatra's needle

Obelisk: Cleopatra's needle

Erection date: /9/1878

Inscription

{The base of the needle carries a large bronze plaque on each face. The monument was undergoing restoration on our visit and we could only see three of the plaques.}

{Plaque on north-east face:}
This obelisk quarried at Syene was erected at On (Heliopolis) by the Pharaoh Thothmes III about 1500 B. C. Lateral inscriptions were added nearly two centuries later by Rameses the Great. Removed during the Greek dynasty to Alexandria, the Royal city of Cleopatra, it was there erected in the 18th year of Augustus Caesar B. C. 12.

{Plaque on south-west face:}
Through the patriotic zeal of Erasmus Wilson F.R.S. this obelisk was brought from Alexandria encased in an iron cylinder. It was abandoned during a storm in the Bay of Biscay, recovered and erected on this spot by John Dixon C. E., in the 42nd year of the reign of Queen Victoria, 1878.

{Plaque on river face:}
This obelisk, prostrate for centuries on the sands of Alexandria, was presented to the British Nation AD 1819 by Mahommed Ali, viceroy of Egypt, a worthy memorial of our distinguished countrymen, Nelson and Abercromby. 

Pink granite, 68.5 feet high, 186 tons. Vulliamy created, and Youngs cast, the bronze sphinxes at the base, about which our colleague, Alan Patient, says: Apparently they are sited incorrectly, in that they should be guarding the obelisk rather than facing it. Presumably it was considered more aesthetically pleasing to place them the way they are.

Site: Cleopatra's needle (2 memorials)

WC2, Victoria Embankment

A misnomer since there is no connection with Cleopatra at all. In 1500 BC Pharaoh Thothmes erected two red granite obelisks at Heliopolis. The Romans took them to Alexandria in 12 BC where an earthquake brought them down. In 1819, following Nelson's victory at the Battle of the Nile, Britain was presented with this (near-buried) obelisk by the Viceroy of Egypt. It was not until 1877 that funds had been raised for shipment to London, which involved building a pontoon barge around the stone. The 'Cleopatra' was not a lucky ship; it was holed and sunk during the launch. Salvaged, it was then almost lost in the Bay of Biscay in a storm in which 6 crew were killed and the barge broke loose from the towing vessel. But eventually it reached London and the obelisk was erected on a plinth containing a time capsule from that era. Its mate was given to the States and erected in Central Park, New York in 1881. The Cleopatra's needle in Place de la Concorde, Paris is also one of a pair but its mate is still in situ in Luxor.

Go to map of other memorials in this area

This section lists the subjects commemorated on the memorial on this page:
Cleopatra's needle

Information Subjects commemorated

52476

Sir Ralph Abercromby

Soldier and politician.  Born Clackmannanshire, Scotland.  Lieutenant-general...

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50534

John Dixon

Civil Engineer from Newcastle. Freemason. His brother, Waynman, was an engi...

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46485

Horatio, Lord Nelson

Born in Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk. Naval commander who became a national hero a...

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46291

Queen Victoria

Reigned: 1837-1901, 64 years. Born Kensington Palace. Daughter of Edward, Duk...

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47129

Erasmus Wilson F.R.S

Surgeon, dermatologist and philanthropist.  Born Marylebone High Street. Died...

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This section lists the subjects who helped to create/erect the memorial on this page:
Cleopatra's needle

Information Created by

47493

H. Young & Co.

Foundry opened in Eccleston Street, Pimlico.

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52475

Mahommed Ali, viceroy of Egypt

Viceroy of Egypt in 1819.  Born in what is now Macedonia.  Regarded as the fo...

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50534

George John Vulliamy

Architect and civil engineer. Son of the clockmaker Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy a...

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This section lists the other memorials at the same location as the memorial on this page:
Cleopatra's needle

Information Also at this site

45451

Cleopatra's needle - war damage

Londonist have a eye-witness account of this event.

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