Building    From 1237  To 1672

Norwich Place / York House

Categories: Property

Built as the town house of the bishops of Norwich. At the dissolution of the monasteries in 1536 King Henry VIII and Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk exchanged properties: Suffolk gave up Suffolk House (Southwark) in exchange for Norwich House.

it was granted to the Archbishop of York in 1556 and thus gained the name York House, which it retained for the rest of its existence.

1558 -1620s the house was given to holders of the title Lord Keeper of the Great Seal (LKGS) of England. 1624 it was acquired by George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, who added the nearby, still extant, York Watergate, in order to gain direct access to the river.

His successors lost the house during the Civil War but his son, the 2nd duke, regained it in 1657 when he married the new owner's daughter. He sold it in 1672 for development by Nicholas Barbon. The house was demolished shortly after the sale. (Do see the 'Of' plaque for how the new streets were named.)

Notable occupants include: Francis Bacon (the son of a LKGS, he was born here and lived here again when he was himselt the LKGS 1617-20), Thomas Egerton (under house arrest in the custody of an LKGS), Peter Paul Rubens.

Most images, including this one, show the river side of the house, including the Watergate, to the right of the image. Whereas this image shows its north front, on Strand.

This copy of a 1658 map shows York House. This 1685 map shows the area after the redevelopment, with all the new streets in place (though the one that is meant to have been named Of Alley is not so labelled).

Sources include: Report.

This section lists the memorials where the subject on this page is commemorated:
Norwich Place / York House

Commemorated ati

Kipling House

The wording on the plaque could have been clearer. The first half is giving t...

Read More

Other Subjects

Duke of Westminster, 2nd, Hugh Grosvenor

Duke of Westminster, 2nd, Hugh Grosvenor

Extremely wealthy man, grandson of the first duke.  Nick-named Bendor, a "jovial" reference to a lost symbol on their coat of arms (go read Wikipedia if this sort if thing interests you).   Had a p...

Person, Politics & Administration, Property

1 memorial
Wimpole Street Post Office

Wimpole Street Post Office

This was at the southern end of Wimpole Street, on the east side.  The Royal Society of Medicine website tells us: "Once again 1 Wimpole Street was given a major refurbishment between 1982 – 86 ......

Building, Commerce, Property

1 memorial
P&O office 122 Leadenhall Street

P&O office 122 Leadenhall Street

In 1848 P&O moved into their new purpose-built offices at no. 122, designed by Beachcroft. In P&O soon bought numbers 123, 124 and 125 Leadenhall Street and expanded their building, also ad...

Building, Property

2 memorials
Blackheath Station

Blackheath Station

Railway station served by trains from London and the North Kent and Bexleyheath lines. It was built using London Brick to a design by George Smith.

Building, Property, Transport

1 memorial
Elm Grove manor

Elm Grove manor

The Percevals moved to Ealing in 1808 and purchased Elm Grove manor which was on the site where All Saints Church now stands.  They had 12 children.  After Spencer's murder the government gave his ...

Building, Property

1 memorial