Person    | Male  Born 21/12/1858  Died 3/2/1931

Alexander Alfred Yeatman

Alexander Alfred Yeatman was born on 21 December 1858 at 20 Providence Place, Kentish Town, Middlesex (now Greater London), the second of the four children of Arthur Yeatman (1829-1903) and Elizabeth Yeatman née Creaton (1827-1907). His birth was registered on 31 January 1859 in the St Pancras registration district by his father who described himself as a chemist. An elder brother, Arthur Yeatman (1856-1858), had died before Alexander Yeatman was born.

He was shown as Alexander A. Yeatman, aged 2 years, on the 1861 census, still residing at 20 Providence Place, Kentish Town, with his parents and a younger brother, Frederick James Yeatman (1860-1923), together with a female house servant. His father was listed as a chemist & druggist. 

In the 1871 census he is shown as aged 12 years, living at 141 Kentish Town Road, Kentish Town, with his parents and two siblings: Frederick James Yeatman and Elizabeth Emily Yeatman (1862-1908). All three children were listed as scholars, whilst his father was described as a chemist & druggist employing one boy.

When the 1881 census was undertaken he was described as a clerk (accountants), still residing at 141 Kentish Town Road with his parents and two of his siblings. His father was listed as a chemist, his brother as a pharmaceutical student and his sister as a student at the Royal Academy of Music.

In the August 1885 Overseers' Returns of Electors he is shown as renting one room on the 1st floor of 47 Lichfield Grove, Church End, Finchley, Middlesex (now Greater London), @ £26 per annum from a Mrs Holson of the same address and he was still shown at this address in the 1886 electoral register.

He was boarding at 9 Lincoln Road, Finchley, the home of Mrs & Mrs James Morley, in the 1891 census and was described as a chartered accountant and musician.

On 9 February 1892 he married Mary Elizabeth Bardsley (1860-1935) at St Mary's Church, Finchley, where in the marriage register he is shown as aged 33 years, a bachelor and a chartered accountant, residing in Finchley whilst his wife was described as aged 31 years, a spinster living in The Rectory, Finchley, where her late father, the Reverend Samuel Bardsley (1822-1891) had been the Rector. The marriage ceremony was conducted by his wife's brother, the Reverend Joseph Udell Norman Bardsley (1868-1928) who was the Vicar of Bradford.

He and his family lived at 35 Lewisham Road, Highgate, Middlesex (now renamed as Laurier Road, London, NW5) between 1893 and 1899.

He was shown as a chartered accountant in 1901 census, living at 14 Queens Avenue, Muswell Hill, Hornsey, Middlesex (now Greater London), with his wife and their four surviving children: Edith Gwendoline Mary Yeatman (1893-1981); Winifred Beatrice Yeatman (1894-1985); Alleyne Alfred Bardsley Yeatman (1895-1970) and Malcolm Bardsley Yeatman (1899-1976), together with a cook, two nurses and a housemaid. A fifth child, Nigel Bardsley Yeatman (1898-1898), had been born on 12 February 1898 but died later that year on 2 September 1898. Their sixth child, Margaret Irene Yeatman (1901-1976), was born after the 1901 census.

His business premises were at 2 Coleman Street in the City of London and on 15 December 1908 he was admitted, by redemption, to the Freedom of the Worshipful Company of Tin Plate Workers alias Wire Workers. The following day he applied to be admitted to the Freedom of the City of London, again by redemption.

When he completed his 1911 census return form he confirmed he was still a chartered accountant and living in the fourteen roomed property at 14 Queens Avenue, Muswell Hill, with his wife, three of their children: Winifred Beatrice Yeatman; Malcolm Bardsley Yeatman and Margaret Irene Yeatman, together with a cook, a nurse and a housemaid.

He was a Justice of the Peace and his year of office as the Mayor of Hornsey was in 1910-1911.On 22 June 1911 he was awarded the King George V Coronation Medal. In the autumn 1919 electoral registers he, his wife and his two sons were shown listed at Red Cottage, Blue House Road, Limpsfield, Surrey.

On 3 February 1931 he died, aged 72 years, at the Marina Hotel, Teignmouth, Devon. His death certificate shows that he died from a cerebral haemorrhage and arteriosclerosis and that his occupation remained as a chartered accountant at 2 Coleman Street, London, EC2.

His body was buried on 5 February 1931 in Plot D3, Grave 84 in the St Marylebone Cemetery, now called the East Finchley Cemetery and Crematorium, 122 East End Road, London, N2 0RZ. On 21 April 1931 probate was granted to The Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corporation Limited and his estate totalled £8,451-2s-8d.

Credit for this entry to: Andrew Behan.

This section lists the memorials created by the subject on this page:
Alexander Alfred Yeatman

Creations i

Hornsey Central Hospital - foundation stone, 1911

This is probably the 'opening' stone for the hospital which was begun in 1907.

Read More

Other Subjects

Worshipful Company of Plumbers

Worshipful Company of Plumbers

Ordinances 1365, Grant of Arms 1588. The Plumbers' Hall used to stand in Chequer Yard, where Cannon Street station now stands. The first hall was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. Rebuilt, it co...

Group, Craft / Design, Liveries & Guilds

4 memorials
John Harris Miles

John Harris Miles

Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Stationers who died in WW1. Andrew Behan has kindly provided this research: Second Lieutenant John Harris Miles was born on 30 May 1886 at 31 Ladbroke Garden...

Person, Liveries & Guilds

War dead, WW1
1 memorial
Cutlers' Hall

Cutlers' Hall

The first recorded Hall was on Ironmonger Lane close to the current Mercers' Hall.  By the early 1400s they were in a building in Cloak Lane. Just before the Great Fire of 1666 the hall was rebuilt...

Building, Liveries & Guilds

1 memorial
Worshipful Company of Butchers

Worshipful Company of Butchers

From the Butchers' website: "Five of our seven Halls were burned down including destruction in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The fourth Hall, in Pudding Lane, was subject to a compulsory purch...

Group, Food & Drink, Liveries & Guilds

2 memorials
Worshipful Company of Broderers' Hall

Worshipful Company of Broderers' Hall

Broderers were workers in embroidery. The Hall existed in Gutter Lane from 1515 but was burnt in the Great Fire of 1666. It was rebuilt but little used, let and became a warehouse in the 19th cent...

Building, Liveries & Guilds

1 memorial