Plaque

Greenwich Foot Tunnel - war bomb damage repair

Greenwich Foot Tunnel - bomb damage repair Greenwich Foot Tunnel - war bomb damage repair
Inscription

Second World War bomb damage repair
This short length of the tunnel was repaired following bomb damage that occurred on the first night of the Blitz on 7 and 8 September 1940 during the second world war.
The damage resulted in the tunnel being closed immediately for repairs to stop leaks and potential flooding. Had the tunnel been more severely damaged, the resulting closure would have had a major long-term impact on travel across the river.
As the tunnel formed a much-relied-upon cross-river link connecting housing in the south and the industry and docks to the north, it was an essential part of the war effort.
Preliminary repairs to stem the inflow of water were successful. By early 1941 the repairs had been completed and the tunnel fully reopened to the public. The repairs included the exposed metal ring segment lining which you can see here today.
Royal Borough of Greenwich

Site: Greenwich Foot Tunnel - bomb damage repair (1 memorial)

E14, Greenwich Foot Tunnel, North End

There are identical plaques at each end of the section of the tunnel that was damaged. As far as we know, these are the only memorials underneath the Thames.

Credit for this entry to: Alan Patient of plaquesoflondon.co.uk

This section lists the subjects commemorated on the memorial on this page:
Greenwich Foot Tunnel - war bomb damage repair

Subjects commemorated i

Greenwich Foot Tunnel

Pedestrian tunnel under the Thames designed by Sir Alexander Binnie, linking ...

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The Blitz

During WW2 Britain came under heavy bombing from Germany for 8 months, 1940-1...

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World War 2

Sorry, we've done no research on WW2, it's just too big a subject. But do vis...

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This section lists the subjects who helped to create/erect the memorial on this page:
Greenwich Foot Tunnel - war bomb damage repair

Created by i

Greenwich Council

The London Borough of Greenwich was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropo...

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